NRDPFC

 




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Publications by Laboratory Personnel

$16,400 in Fines and Hunting Suspensions for Illegal Moose Hunt (Posted April, 2014)

$11250 in fines for illegal moose hunt and cover up (Posted November 25, 2010)

TIPS Call Nabs Two Poachers (Posted July 20, 2010)

Major Fines for Wildlife Offences (Posted May 20, 2010)

$3,500 In Fines For Moose Hunting In Provincial Park (Posted April 20, 2010)

Information regarding the use of DNA fingerprinting for individual identification in wildlife cases
can be found in:

Guglich, Elizabeth, Wilson, Paul J., and White, Dr. Bradley N. 1993. Application of DNA fingerprinting to Enforcement of Hunting Regulations in Ontario. Journal of Forensic Sciences 38: 48-59.

Included in this article are case summaries highlighting the use of DNA fingerprinting in the prosecution of two cases involving the poaching of white-tailed deer and two cases involving the poaching of moose in Ontario.

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Information regarding species identification of animal tissue through the use of species-specific
highly repetitive DNA markers is detailed in:

Guglich, Elizabeth, Wilson, Paul J., and White, Dr. Bradley N. 1994. Forensic Application of Repetitive DNA Markers to the Species Identification of Animal Tissues".
Journal of Forensic Sciences 39: 353-361.

Two case applications are presented in this article. One application involved the illegal sale of moose meat, while the other involved the illegal sale of white-tailed deer meat.

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Information regarding gender identification on ungulates through the use of a sex determining
marker is detailed in:

Wilson, Paul J., and White, Dr. Bradley N. 1998. Sex Identification of Elk (Cervus elaphus Canadensis), Moose (Alces alces), and White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) Using the Polymerase Chaine Reaction. Journal of Forensic Sciences. 477-482.

Included in this article is a case application involving the confirmation of gender as being consistent
with that of the validation tag from the hunter.

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Information regarding gender identification on a variety of mammalian tissues through the
use of markers on the sex chromosomes is detailed in:

Shaw, Carla, N., Wilson, Paul, J. and White, Bradley, N. In review. A reliable method of gender determination for mammals. Journal of Mammology.
Included in this article is the amplification of numerous tissues from a variety of species including, beluga whales, right whales, wolves, coyotes, black bear, moose and deer for confirmation of gender.

 

 

Trent University Wildlife Forensic DNA Laboratory
DNA Building, Rm A109
2140 East Bank Drive, Peterborough, Ontario, Canada, K9J 7B8
Phone: (705) 748-1011 x7687| Fax (705) 748-1132
Email: forensiclab@nrdpfc.ca